What is the Best Breed of Dog for your Personality?

What is the Best Breed of Dog for your Personality?

by Kyla Dewar

If you're considering getting a new dog, odds are you have more than one dog breed on your wishlist. They're all adorable, and there are just way too many to choose from. We get it. It's a big ask to narrow it down to only one.


But though you may have a preference for a particular breed, it's important to note that aesthetics aren't everything. Just because you like the way it looks doesn't mean it will blend in well with you or your personality.


When it comes to humans, psychologists believe that five main personality traits make us who we are. As humans, we all contain some combination of these traits but often lean more strongly towards one or another. These traits are:


  • Openness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Extraversion
  • Agreeableness
  • Neuroticism


Similarly, every dog breed has its own set of unique personality traits too. Though no two dogs are the same, it is common knowledge that most dogs of the same breed tend to behave and respond similarly to certain situations. Because of this, it's essential to choose not only based on its appearance but its personality as well.


So how do you find your perfect pooch? Well, a common trend in dog owners is that they tend to gravitate towards breeds that complement their traits and lifestyles. 


For example, if you're an active person, the last thing you'd want is a lazy couch potato who refuses to move from its spot in the sun. Similarly, if you're a person with a busy schedule, you may struggle with a dog that's attached to you at the hip and requires a lot of attention and stimulation.


If you're still trying to decide which breed is best, below is some information that may help you choose the best breed of dog for your personality.

Openness

A high level of openness is often associated with those who enjoy adventures. Highly open people are generally more curious than others, have a greater appreciation for arts and culture, and are much more likely to try new things.


If you feel like you strongly identify as open, these dogs may be a good fit for you:



On the opposite end of the spectrum, less open people tend to be very habit-based and are often very set in their ways.


If you feel like you are less open, then these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Conscientiousness


A highly conscientious person is often referred to as a planner. They are usually labelled as organized, disciplined, and goal-oriented. However, they are also incredibly loyal people who stick with something until it is complete.


If you feel like you strongly identify as conscientious, these dogs may be a good fit for you:



In contrast, a less conscientious person is more often considered to be free-spirited. They can also be categorized as spontaneous. These are usually the people who think before they speak and take action without much forethought.


If you feel like you are less conscientious, then these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Extraversion


An extroverted person is also known as a social butterfly. This is a person who is incredibly chatty, friendly, and cheerful. They tend to enjoy spending time with lots of different people and fit in very well in most environments they are introduced to.

If you feel like you strongly identify as an extrovert, these dogs may be a good fit for you:



An introverted person tends to prefer more time alone and is often considered reserved. Introverts are generally happier in smaller groups of people they know well and more readily embrace a relaxed and quiet lifestyle.


If you feel like you strongly identify as an introvert, then these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Agreeableness


A more agreeable person is generally more compassionate, helpful, trusting, kind, and warm. These are the people who often believe the best in others.

If you feel like you strongly identify as agreeable, these dogs may be a good fit for you:



A person with a lower level of agreeableness is less cooperative and are generally more cynical. They are less likely to take a person for their word and are often considered to be suspicious of others.


If you feel like you are less agreeable, then these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Neuroticism


People with high levels of neuroses are often referred to as "worrywarts." These are people who tend to overanalyze situations and often suffer from anxiety.

If you feel like you strongly identify as "neurotic," these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Oppositely, a person with low levels of neuroses will often come across more even-keeled. These are people who when faced with adversity tend to rise above without constant worry or fear.


If you feel like you are less "neurotic" then these dogs may be a good fit for you:



Pick Your Pooch


How compatible you are with your dog will shape the relationship you have with it. How well you get along with it will also make your life much more comfortable or substantially harder. That's why when it comes to finding the best dog breed for you, personality is a crucial factor. 


Though other factors — like where you live, its size, and more — may also play into your decision-making as well, in the end, personality often comes out on top. So if you're looking for your perfect canine companion, start your search based on personality and work out from there.

About the Author
Kyla Dewar
Kyla holds a bachelor's degree in Journalism from Ryerson University and has been featured in several newspapers and magazines since beginning her career as a writer. She currently works as a Care Communication Specialist at CareGuide and is the lead writer and editor for blog content on Housekeeper.com, ElderCare.com, HouseSitter.com, CanadianNanny.ca, PetSitter.com, and Sitter.com.